Reading the Bible in a Year | June reading plan

How to read the Bible chronologically in a year...with your child

We’re wrapping up another month in 2020, and we feel weary with the heaviness of the world right now. COVID-19 is still limiting our ability to connect in real life with friends and family. Jobs and finances are serious stressors for many of us. And in the last week, the struggle for racial equality has come to a head in a necessary and extremely painful way. As we take in all this loss and pain, we’re finding firm ground in these daily readings.

Resource: Our Bible in a Year reading plan for June (PDF)

Psalm 25:17 says, “The troubles of my heart have multiplied; free me from my anguish.”

Psalm 26:22 claims, “Yet you heard my cry for mercy when I called to you for help.”

Psalm 94 says, “When anxiety was great within me, your consolation brought joy to my soul.”

Psalm 48:10 reminds us, “For this God is our God for ever and ever; he will be our guide even to the end.”

And Psalm 102:10 says, “Let this be written for a future generation, that a people not yet created may praise the Lord.”

Download now: Our June Bible reading plan (PDF)

Reading through David’s tumultuous life and his constant return to God, his true desire that a future generation would read his words and praise the Lord because of them, give me hope. This month, we’re looking at the end of King Solomon’s reign and the difficult, divided years that follow for Israel. The prophets appear and begin to speak God’s truth to the people, but they don’t often listen.

May we be a people who listen.

Quick note: I’m using the Chronological Study Bible (affiliate link) as my guide for putting together these readings, and it isn’t exactly chronological — some of Solomon’s proverbs are provided following his death, for example. But I enjoy the way we start to see the prophets woven into the historical narratives of Chronicles and Kings this month. It’s lots of flipping around, but I think it’s worth it. If you’d rather not flip back and forth in your regular Bible, you could purchase this one. The historical notes in it are fascinating.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s